Best books in Immigrants 2018

Showing bestselling books in Immigrants 1 to 10

Browse some of the top selling books in Immigrants from 2018. A top ten of popular books in Immigrants from 1 to 10. At the bottom of the page you can explore some of the new book releases in this category, if you haven't found what you are looking for in this top 10. If you still can't find your next favorite book or ebook to read in 'Immigrants' you can try and look for more books by using the search box on the top of the page and search by keyword, author or title.

Product picture for The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of Americas Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson
Book › Paperback
In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.

The New York Times  • USA Today • O: The Oprah Magazine • Amazon • Publishers Weekly...
Book cover from Nine Irish Lives: The Thinkers, Fighters, and Artists Who Helped Build America by Mark Bailey
Book › Paperback
Through the battles they fought, the cases they argued, the novels they wrote, and the lives they touched, these nine Irish men and women not only became American but helped make our nation what it is today.

In the spirit of David McCullough’s Brave Companions, this anthology of popular American history presents the stories of nine incredible Irish immigrants as written by nine contemporary Irish Americans. Rosie O’Donnell, for instance, the adoptive mother of five, tells the story of Margaret Haughery, known as “Mother of the Orphans”; filmmaker and activist Michael Moore...
Book cover from The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust 1941-1945 by David S. Wyman
Book › Paperback
The Abandonment of the Jews received enormous critical and commercial attention when it was first released in 1984, appearing on the New York Times bestseller list for five weeks as well as on its Best Books of the Year list. A selection of the History Book Club and the Jewish Book Club, it has sold over 100,000 copies in its various editions.

In this landmark work, David S. Wyman argues that a substantial commitment to rescue European Jews on the part of the United States almost certainly could have saved several hundred thousand of the Nazis’ victims. Widely considered to be the...
Book cover from Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America by Juan Gonzalez
Book › Paperback
A sweeping history of the Latino experience in the United States- thoroughly revised and updated.

The first new edition in ten years of this important study of Latinos in U.S. history, Harvest of Empire spans five centuries-from the first New World colonies to the first decade of the new millennium. Latinos are now the largest minority group in the United States, and their impact on American popular culture-from food to entertainment to literature-is greater than ever. Featuring family portraits of real- life immigrant Latino pioneers, as well as accounts of the events and...
Book cover from Uprooting Racism - 4th edition: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice by Paul Kivel
Book › Paperback
In 2016, the president-elect of the United States openly called for segregation and deportation based on race and religion. Meanwhile, inequalities in education, housing, health care, and the job market continue to prevail, while increased insecurity and fear have led to an epidemic of scapegoating and harassment of people of color. Yet, recent polls show that only thirty-one percent of white people in the United States believe racism is a major societal problem; at the same time, resistance is strong, as highlighted by indigenous struggles for land and sovereignty and the Movement for Black...
Book cover from How the Irish Became White (Routledge Classics) by Noel Ignatiev
Book › Paperback
'…from time to time a study comes along that truly can be called ‘path breaking,’ ‘seminal,’ ‘essential,’ a ‘must read.’ How the Irish Became White is such a study.' John Bracey, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachussetts, Amherst

The Irish came to America in the eighteenth century, fleeing a homeland under foreign occupation and a caste system that regarded them as the lowest form of humanity. In the new country – a land of opportunity – they found a very different form of social hierarchy, one that was based on the...
Book cover from A Nation of Immigrants by John F Kennedy
Book › Paperback
Throughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland. This modern edition of his posthumously published, timeless work—with a new introduction by Senator Edward M. Kennedy and a foreword by Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League—offers the late president's inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a...
Book cover from The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris by David McCullough
Book › Paperback
The #1 bestseller that tells the remarkable story of the generations of American artists, writers, and doctors who traveled to Paris, the intellectual, scientific, and artistic capital of the western world, fell in love with the city and its people, and changed America through what they learned, told by America’s master historian, David McCullough.

Not all pioneers went west.

In The Greater Journey, David McCullough tells the enthralling, inspiring—and until now, untold—story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, and others who set off for...
Book cover from Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America by Jim Webb
Book › Paperback
More than 27 million Americans today can trace their lineage to the Scots, whose bloodline was stained by centuries of continuous warfare along the border between England and Scotland, and later in the bitter settlements of England’s Ulster Plantation in Northern Ireland. Between 250,000 and 400,000 Scots-Irish migrated to America in the eighteenth century, traveling in groups of families and bringing with them not only long experience as rebels and outcasts but also unparalleled skills as frontiersmen and guerrilla fighters. Their cultural identity reflected acute individualism, dislike...
Book cover from Coming to America: A History of Immigration and Ethnicity in American Life by Roger Daniels
Book › Paperback
With a timely new chapter on immigration in the current age of globalization, a new Preface, and new appendixes with the most recent statistics, this revised edition is an engrossing study of immigration to the United States from the colonial era to the present.

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Parent categories: ›› United States