Book cover from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: The inspiration for the films Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049 by Philip K. Dick
Book cover 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: The inspiration for the films Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049'

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: The inspiration for the films Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049

BUY NOW
$9.89
-38% on list price
Used from $1.50  New from $9.28
(as of 04/25/2019 17:12 PST - Details)
Author(s): Philip K. Dick
Format: Book › Paperback all formats
Published: 05-28-1996
ISBN: 0345404475
Pages: 240
Publisher: Del Rey
List Price: $16.00

BooksToRead Review

As is generally known Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by the enigmatic science fiction author Philip K. Dick served as the source of inspiration for the SF movie Blade Runner with Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer. But inspiration is the right term here because there are some big differences between the story of the film and the story of the book. The story of Philip K. Dick is not about the "human" robot at all, on the contrary. Philip K. Dick's android's mind is fundamentally different from humans and is inhuman in a world where people themselves are also lost emotionally. Emphasis on empathy as the big difference between man and robot culminates in the funny urge of man to have a real living pet, also as a status symbol. In a world where animals are almost extinct and people are often forced to take a mechanical pet because they do not have money for a real live one, the relationship of man with his pet is a requirement for humans to be emotionally stable. Other interesting science fiction books by Dick include The Man in the High Castle, Ubik and The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, alongside many others.

By 2021, the World War has killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remain covet any living creature, and for people who can't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacra: horses, birds, cats, sheep. They've even built humans. Immigrants to Mars receive androids so sophisticated they are indistinguishable from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans can wreak, the government bans them from Earth. Driven into hiding, unauthorized androids live among human beings, undetected. Rick Deckard, an officially sanctioned bounty hunter, is commissioned to find rogue androids and 'retire' them. But when cornered, androids fight back with lethal force.

Book description

A masterpiece ahead of its time, a prescient rendering of a dark future, and the inspiration for the blockbuster film Blade Runner

By 2021, the World War has killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remain covet any living creature, and for people who can’t afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacra: horses, birds, cats, sheep. They’ve even built humans. Immigrants to Mars receive androids so sophisticated they are indistinguishable from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans can wreak, the government bans them from Earth. Driven into hiding, unauthorized androids live among human beings, undetected. Rick Deckard, an officially sanctioned bounty hunter, is commissioned to find rogue androids and “retire” them. But when cornered, androids fight back—with lethal force.

Praise for Philip K. Dick

“The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world.”—John Brunner

“A kind of pulp-fiction Kafka, a prophet.”The New York Times

“[Philip K. Dick] sees all the sparkling—and terrifying—possibilities . . . that other authors shy away from.”Rolling Stone

Similar books to 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: The inspiration for the films Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049'

Product picture for A Scanner Darkly by Philip K. Dick
Paperback
“Dick is Thoreau plus the death of the American dream.”—Roberto Bolaño Bob Arctor is a junkie and a drug dealer, both using and selling the mind-altering Substance D....
Book cover from The hungry woman : A Mexican Medea by Cherrie L. Moraga
Paperback
In The Hungry Woman, an apocalyptic play written at the end of the millennium, Moraga uses mythology and an intimate realism to describe the embattled position of Chicanos and...
Book cover from The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
Paperback
“The single most resonant and carefully imagined book of Dick’s career.” —New York Times   It’s America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still...
Book cover from Ubik by Philip K. Dick
Paperback
“From the stuff of space opera, Dick spins a deeply unsettling existential horror story, a nightmare you’ll never be sure you’ve woken up from.”—Lev Grossman, Time ...
Book cover from The Road by Cormac McCarthy
Paperback
NATIONAL BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE The searing, post-apocalyptic novel about a father and son's fight to survive. A father and his son walk alone through burned...
Book cover from Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
Paperback
An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior,...
Book cover from Neuromancer by William Gibson
Mass Market Paperback
Winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer is a science fiction masterpiece—a classic that ranks as one of the twentieth century’s most potent visions...
Book cover from Neuromancer by William Gibson
Paperback
Winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer is a science fiction masterpiece—a classic that ranks as one of the twentieth century’s most potent visions...
Book cover from The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
Hardcover
“The single most resonant and carefully imagined book of Dick’s career.” —New York Times   It’s America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still...
Book cover from Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said by Philip K. Dick
Paperback
"Dick skillfully explores the psychological ramifications of this nightmare."—The New York Times Review of Books Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said grapples with many of the...